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USS Merrimack (AO 179)

- decommissioned -

USS MERRIMACK was the third ship in the CIMARRON-class of five fleet oilers. Decommissioned on December 18, 1998, the ship spent the following years laid up on the James River at Fort Eustis, Va. Sold for scrapping on May 1, 2013, the MERRIMACK left Virginia under tow for Southern Recycling at Amelia, La., on May 21, 2013. She was last homeported in Norfolk, Va.

General Characteristics:Awarded: January 25, 1977
Keel laid: July 16, 1979
Launched: May 17, 1980
Commissioned: November 14, 1981
Decommissioned: December 18, 1998
Builder: Avondale Shipyards, Inc., New Orleans, LA
Propulsion system: two 600psi Boilers (Automated Steam)
Propellers: one
Length: 700 feet (213.4 meters)
Beam: 88 feet (26.8 meters)
Draft: 32 feet (9.7 meters)
Displacement: approx. 37,000 tons
Speed: 19 knots
Capacity: 150,000 barrels of fuel oil or aviation fuel and several tons of additional goods
Aircraft: none, but helicopter platform
Armament: two 20mm Phalanx CIWS
Crew:15 officers and 215 enlisted


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Crew List:

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS MERRIMACK. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.


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USS MERRIMACK Cruise Books:


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About the Ship's Coat of Arms:

The Shield:

MERRIMACK is represented by the anchor at the center. Located on a blue disc, it radiates to the border, representing the Fleet. The anchor's centralized location alludes to MERRIMACK's responsibilities in the distribution of various fuels throughout the free fleets of the world, thereby acting as a focal point for worldwide mobility.

The Crest:

Basic Colors, blue and gold, representing the United States Naval power; blue and gold are the U.S. Navy colors. Star with gauntlet holding a trident: The three parts of this symbol represent the three previous ships to have borne the name MERRIMACK. The eight-pointed star reflects the eight battle stars awarded to the oiler USS MERRIMACK (AO 37) during World War II. The gauntlet suggests the Civil War; MERRIMACK, the first ironclad for the Southern States. The trident represents the first MERRIMACK, a sailing man-of-war launched in 1798, and the skillful seamanship necessary to navigate under sail.

The Motto:

"TRADITIO SERVITI" from Latin, meaning "Tradition of Service".


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Accidents aboard USS MERRIMACK:

DateWhereEvents
May 30, 1996Mediterranean Sea, 60 nautical miles south of France
USS MERRIMACK experienced a boiler casualty while lighting off the 1-B boiler at approximately 1:24 p.m. local time. The crew was conducting a routine light-off of the 1-B boiler while conducting basic engineering casualty control exercises.

There was no apparent damage to the boiler, however the accident required an inspection and recertification of the 1-B boiler. No personnel injuries or casualties were reported. An investigation of the accident was conducted.

The ship was conducting routine Sixth Fleet operations at the time of the accident.

USS STOUT (DDG 55) was in the area to provide assistance if needed.


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