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USS Everett F. Larson (DD 830)

- formerly DDR 830 -
- decommissioned -


USS EVERETT F. LARSON was one of the GEARING - class destroyers and the second ship in the Navy to bear the name. The first one was DE 554 but that ship's construction was canceled on June 10, 1944, and the name was reassigned to DD 830. EVERETT F. LARSON was decommissioned on October 30, 1972, and was turned over to the Republic of Korea Navy, initially on loan and later by sale. Renamed JEONG BUK, she had nearly three decades of Korean service before being discarded in 2000 to become a museum and memorial in South Korea.

General Characteristics:Awarded: 1943
Keel laid: September 4, 1944
Launched: January 28, 1945
Commissioned: April 6, 1945
Decommissioned: October 30, 1972
Builder: Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine
FRAM II Conversion Shipyard: Long Beach Naval Shipyard, Long Beach, CA
FRAM II Conversion Period: 1962 - January 1963
Propulsion system: four boilers, General Electric geared turbines; 60,000 SHP
Propellers: two
Length: 391 feet (119.2 meters)
Beam: 41 feet (12.5 meters)
Draft: 18.7 feet (5.7 meters)
Displacement: approx. 3,400 tons full load
Speed: 34 knots
Aircraft after FRAM II: two DASH drones
Armament after FRAM II: three 5-inch/38 caliber twin mounts, Mk-32 ASW torpedo tubes (two triple mounts), two Hedgehogs Mk-10
Crew after FRAM II: approx. 275


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Crew List:

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS EVERETT F. LARSON. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.


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USS EVERETT F. LARSON History:

EVERETT F. LARSON was launched 28 January 1945 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine; sponsored by Mrs. H. Larson, mother of Private First Class Larson; and commissioned 6 April 1945, Commander H. Meyers in command. She was reclassified DDR 830 on 18 March 1949.

EVERETT F. LARSON sailed from Boston 1 August 1945 for the Pacific, and on 29 September arrived at Tokyo Bay. During her lengthy occupation service, she participated in the landing of Marines at Taku, China, in October 1945, and in Operation "Road's End," the sinking of 24 captured Japanese submarines in April 1946. She put in to San Diego, Calif., 21 December, bound for Newport, R.I., her assigned home port, where she arrived 19 March 1947.

During her 9 years with the Atlantic Fleet, EVERETT F. LARSON completed seven tours of duty with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, patrolling the Near East during the crisis over the Palestine partition and joining in NATO training cruises in 1948 and 1955, and participated in antisubmarine warfare activities off the east coast, as well as training in the Caribbean.

On 28 June 1956, EVERETT F. LARSON arrived at Long Beach, Calif., her home port for duty in the Pacific Fleet. Operations off the coast of California, and north to Seattle, prepared her for deployments to the Far East in 1957, 1958, 1959, and 1960. During these she served on patrol duty off Taiwan, exercised off Okinawa and in the Philippines, and acted as escort and plane guard for the carriers of TF 77. Outward bound for her 1958 tour, she called at Pago Pago, Samoa, and Auckland, New Zealand.

EVERETT F. LARSON's last eastern Pacific operation prior to her 1960 deployment to the western Pacific was as a unit of the U.S. First Fleet passing in review in the annual "Great White Fleet Review", in September 1960, in San Francisco Bay. In March 1961, the ship returned home to Long Beach again from its western Pacific duties.

During the last half of 1962, EVERETT F. LARSON was modernized as part of the FRAM ("Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization") II program, which replaced her distinctive radar picket features with a largely new superstructure containing a small hangar for "DASH" drone helicopters. Other antisubmarine weapons were also installed, and the ship was redesignated DD 830 shortly before the shipyard work was completed.

From 1963 until the end of the decade, EVERETT F. LARSON went to the western Pacific on an annual basis, regularly using her five-inch guns for bombardment purposes during Vietnam War operations from 1965 on. She also served as a plane guard for aircraft carriers during the conflict, was in the Sea of Japan for several weeks after North Korea captured the intelligence ship PUEBLO in January 1968, and took part in a variety of exercises involving ships of the U.S. and allied navies. While so engaged in early June 1969, EVERETT F. LARSON came to the assistance of the destroyer FRANK E. EVANS that was cut in two in a tragic collision with the Australian aircraft carrier MELBOURNE.

In 1971 and 1972, EVERETT F. LARSON had two final Seventh Fleet tours, serving off Vietnam during both. She came home in July 1972 and was prepared for transfer abroad. USS EVERETT F. LARSON decommissioned at the end of October 1972 and was turned over to the Republic of Korea Navy, initially on loan and later by sale. Renamed JEONG BUK, she had nearly three decades of Korean service before being discarded in 2000 to become a museum and memorial in South Korea.


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About the Ship's Name:

Everett Frederick Larson, born 3 September 1920 in Stamford, Conn., enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve 13 January 1942. Serving on Guadalcanal, Private First Class Larson was killed in action 8 October 1942, while attempting to swim the Matankiau River under heavy enemy fire to rescue a wounded comrade. He was posthumously awarded the Silver Star for this selfless courage, and shared in the Presidential Unit Citation awarded his division for its actions on Guadalcanal.


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After FRAM II Conversion:




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