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USS Miami (SSN 755)

- deactivated -




USS MIAMI was the fifth of the 23 improved LOS ANGELES - class attack submarines and the third ship in the Navy named after the city in Florida. On May 23, 2012, the MIAMI suffered a major fire while dry-docked at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, Maine. Caused by arson, the fire causes $700 million damage to the submarine, forcing the Navy to retire the MIAMI in a time of budget cuts.

General Characteristics:Awarded: November 28, 1983
Keel Laid: October 24, 1986
Launched: November 12, 1988
Commissioned: June 30, 1990
Decommissioned: September 27, 2013
Builder: Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation, Groton, CT
Propulsion system: one nuclear reactor
Propellers: one
Length: 360 feet (109.73 meters)
Beam: 33 feet (10 meters)
Draft: 32,15 feet (9.8 meters)
Displacement: Surfaced: approx. 6,255 tons
Submerged: approx. 7,102 tons
Speed: Surfaced: approx. 15 knots
Submerged: approx. 32 knots
Armament: Tomahawk missiles from 12 VLS-tubes, four 533 mm torpedo tubes for Mk-48 torpedoes, Harpoon missiles, ability to lay mines
Cost: approx. $900 million
Crew: 12 Officers, 115 Enlisted


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Crew List:

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS MIAMI. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.


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Accidents aboard USS MIAMI:

DateWhereEvents
May 24, 2012Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, MaineA fire breaks out aboard USS MIAMI while the submarine is dry-docked at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard for a 20-month engineered overhaul and modernization period. The fire started in the forward compartment at approx. 5.45 pm on May 24 and was extinguished the next morning at 3.30 am. MIAMI's reactor wasn't operating at the time and was not affected by the fire and no weapons were aboard. A shipyard spokesman reported that seven people received minor injuries. They were treated in a nearby medical facility and were released shortly afterwards. Initial findings indicated the fire started in a vacuum cleaner used to clean worksites at the end of shift, and stored in an unoccupied space.

On July 23, 2012, a civilian painter and sandblaster working on the MIAMI admitted to setting the fire to get out of work early. On March 15, 2013, he is sentenced to over 17 years in federal prison and ordered to pay $400 million in restitution.

On August 22, 2012, the Navy's estimated cost to restore USS MIAMI is approximately $450 million, with an estimated date of completion for the repairs of April 30, 2015. The estimate included 10 percent variability due to the unique nature of the repair and the cost impacts of shifting the planned maintenance availabilities of other ships and submarines.

On August 6, 2013, the Navy notified Congress it plans to stop repairing the USS MIAMI and inactivate it. In April, they discovered additional cracking on board the submarine and the cost of the repairs increased from an estimated $450 million to $700 million. On September 27, 2013, MIAMI is deactivated.


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USS MIAMI Patch Gallery:

MED '98/'99


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